Episode 231: Ian Mond, James Bradley and the 2015 Hugo Novel Shortlist

This week James Bradley and Ian Mond join Jonathan to discuss the five novels that have made the final Hugo Awards ballot. The shortlisted novels are:

  • Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK) 
  • The Dark Between the Stars by Kevin J. Anderson (Tor Books) 
  • The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison (Sarah Monette) (Tor Books) 
  • The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu, translated by Ken Liu (Tor) 
  • Skin Game by Jim Butcher (Roc Books)
We almost completely avoid issues surrounding the ballot, and instead focus on discussing the novels and what might make them interesting to read.  Our thanks to James and Ian for making time to record the podcast. As always, we hope you enjoy the episode!
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Episode 230: K J Parker and the history of a writer

TwoOfSwords.jpgThis week’s very special episode is a conversation with the superb and formerly mysterious K.J. Parker, whose newest work The Two of Swords begins serialization this week from Orbit, and whose Savages is due later this summer from Subterranean Press.  


We discuss the influence of writers as diverse as E.F. Benson, P.G. Wodehouse, Mercedes Lackey, and C.J. Cherryh, the reason there isn’t much overt magic in Parker’s worlds, the freedom offered by fantasy over straight historical fiction, the relative advantages of novellas vs. novels, where all that wonderful dialogue comes from, and—of course—who K.J. Parker really is...

As always, we hope you enjoy the podcast!
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Coming up on Coode Street

Savages_by_K_J_Parker.jpgBusy times at Coode Street! Later today there'll be a special episode featuring mysterious British writer K.J. Parker. We discuss writing under a pseudonym, who Parker really is, writing fantasy without magic, literary influences, new projects and much more. 

But that's not all. We already have a discussion with Paolo Bacigalupi in the can and ready to come out in May, and are about to sit down and have a chat with Kim Stanley Robinson about his new novel, Aurora.  There'll also be the next instalment in our Forthcoming Books discussions with Liza Trombi from Locus and we're working on some other interesting plans that we're excited about.
We haven't forgotten, though, what makes Coode Street what it is. We'll be sitting down for some old school rambles, hoping to get in a few before convention season gets Gary traveling and awards season distracts us all.  That's all a lead up to World Fantasy in Saratoga where we hope to do something special.
All in all, we think this is making for one of the best years in the history of the podcast. As always, we hope you're enjoying the episodes and that you'll stick with us for the rest of the year!
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K.J. Parker on the ‘cast

With a little good fortune the next episode of the Coode Street Podcast will be out with the world sometime in the next thirty-six hours. This week's episode features the first ever "live" interview/chat with World Fantasy Award winning author K.J. Parker. We will be talking about Parker's new online project with Orbit, new novel with Subterranean and, of course, what it means to be K.J. Parker./ We've been waiting for this one for a while, and think it should be pretty special.

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Episode 229: On books, history, awards and such

This has been a busy year for the Coode Street Podcast, talking to interesting guests, covering a wide-range of issues, and being syndicated by our friends at Tor.com. For a bit of change, Gary and Jonathan decided to sit down together and record an old-fashioned Coode Street Podcast, just two guys rambling about science fiction.

Topics covered, or touched on, included awards (of course), politics, the anniversary of SF classics, what makes a a work entertaining, and more.  All in all, a pretty typical episode of the podcast.  As always, we hope you enjoy the episode and will be back for more next week!
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Episode 228: John Scalzi and Alisa Krasnostein

scalzi.jpgWith Swancon 40, the 2015 Australian National Science Fiction Convention, in full swing Jonathan sat down with convention guest of honour John Scalzi and Twelfth Planet Press editor/publisher Alisa Krasnostein to discuss science fiction, community, Robert Heinlein, having just finished new novel The End of All Things and more!

As always, we'd like to thank John and Alisa for appearing on the podcast. John's next novel, The End of All Things, is out for preorder and you can support the Pozible campaign for Alisa's new project Defying Doomsday here. 
We hope you enjoy the episode!
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Episode 227: Ken Liu, Joe Monti and The Grace of Kings

graceofkings.jpgThis week Gary* is joined by award-winning author Ken Liu and Joe Monti, Executive Editor at Saga Press, to discuss Ken's exciting debut novel The Grace of Kings, his forthcoming collection The Paper Menagerie, and much more.

As always we'd like to thank Ken and Joe for making the time to talk to us. And we hope you enjoy the podcast!
The Grace of Kings is in stores next week.
* Jonathan missed this episode due to illness.
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Episode 226: Silvia Moreno-Garcia and Signal to Noise

Signal to Noise, Silvia Moreno-GarciaThis weekend Silvia Moreno-Garcia joins us to talk about her debut fantasy novel, Signal to Noise. 


Described in an upcoming issue of Locus as “one of the most important fantasy debuts of the year”, it’s an engaging and compelling story of a woman returning to her family home in Mexico for her father’s funeral, and of a time in her teens when she discovered that the right music played just the right way could change the world. 

It may be that we grew up at the right time, it may be that Meche’s past overlapped mine in just the right way, but we loved this gentle, moving book quite a bit.

If you have any interest in fantasy and music, then we think Signal to Noise is for you. It’s the best genre book about music that Jonathan has read since Lewis Shiner’s Glimpses


The publisher describes the book like this:
A literary fantasy about love, music and sorcery, set against the background of Mexico City.

Mexico City, 1988: Long before iTunes or MP3s, you said “I love you” with a mixtape. Meche, awkward and fifteen, has two equally unhip friends -- Sebastian and Daniela -- and a whole lot of vinyl records to keep her company. When she discovers how to cast spells using music, the future looks brighter for the trio. With help from this newfound magic, the three friends will piece together their broken families, change their status as non-entities, and maybe even find love...

Mexico City, 2009: Two decades after abandoning the metropolis, Meche returns for her estranged father’s funeral. It’s hard enough to cope with her family, but then she runs into Sebastian, and it revives memories from her childhood she thought she buried a long time ago. What really happened back then? What precipitated the bitter falling out with her father? And, is there any magic left?

Silvia was a terrific guest and the conversation we recorded talks about the book in an interesting way that really complements reading the book. Consider picking up a copy of Silvia’s book. It’s Coode Street Recommended.

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Coode Street - Tshirts

A quick reminder, should you be interested, that we do have Coode Street merchandise! T-shirts. Lovingly designed, criminally undersold, these wonderful designs with original Coode St logos, attractive layout, and witty sayings could be yours.  Pretty much entirely non-profit, we nonethless commend them to the keen Coode Street listener.  

You can check out and order Coode Street t-shirts here.
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Episode 225: Biancotti, Lanagan, Westerfeld and Zeroes

This week Deborah BiancottiMargo Lanagan, and Scott Westerfeld join Gary and Jonathan in the Gershwin Room (aka Skype) to discuss their exciting new book project, Zeroes. Our discussion ranges from collaborating, and all of the ins and outs of collaboration, to superheroes and the origins of the new series.  Zeroes will be released in September.

As always, we would like to thank Deborah, Margo, and Scott for joining us, and hope you enjoy the episode.
Next week: Silvia Moreno-Garcia, strong female characters and Signal to Noise.
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Episode 224: Kelly Link Gets in Trouble

This week we welcome the remarkable Kelly Link, celebrating her new collection Get In Trouble, her recent anthology with Gavin Grant getintrouble.jpg, her career in general, and what’s coming up from Small Beer Press.  We talk about the differences (if there are any) between adult and YA fiction, genre and mainstream, the possibility of a new novel, and what we did or didn’t read in school. 

In addition to discussing Kelly’s own fiction and her rapidly growing reputation between Stranger Things Happen and Get in Trouble, we touch upon other books and authors from T.H. White’s The Once and Future Kingto Peter Straub’s “Hunger: An Introduction,” from Ray Bradbury to Shirley Jackson.  And Kelly, who loves ghost stories, raises the very good question of why we return to the same stories again and again, even long after we know what’s going to happen.  Listen, and see if any of us come up with a good answer for that. 
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Episode 223: Alisa Krasnostein, Sean Wright, Tehani Wessely and the Aurealis Awards

As the Aurealis Awards reach their twentieth anniversary, Jonathan sits down with Aurealis Awards judging co-ordinator Tehani Wessely, publisher Alisa Krasnostein, and critic Sean Wright to discuss the Aurealis Awards, their history and the recently released 2014 Aurealis Awards shortlist.

This is the first time two episodes of Coode Street have been recorded and released on the same day! Our thanks to Alisa, Tehani and Sean for making the time to be available to record the podcast. As always, we hope you enjoy the episode!
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Episode 222: Forthcoming Books with Liza Trombi

locusmarch.jpgWe are always on the look-out for new and exciting books to read, and always want to know what we should keep an eye out for.  For years we've relied on Locus's quarterly Forthcoming Books issues as a guide on what to look for.


One of the very earliest ideas for the Coode Street Podcast was that each month we'd sit down and discuss the newest issue of Locus. That didn't happen, but hopefully this is the start of a new series where, once every three months, we sit down with Locus Editor-in-Chief Liza Trombi to discuss what's new and exciting, and what we all should be looking for in the month's ahead.

Our thanks to Liza for making time to record the podcast. The March issue of Locus will be on sale shortly.  We hope to get a list of titles from the episode up here soon.

As always, we hope you enjoy the episode. More next week. 
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Coming up on Coode Street

Coming up this weekend in episode 222 of the Coode Street Podcast, Deborah Biancotti, Margo Lanagan, and Scott Westerfeld join us to talk about their exciting new project, Zeroes, collaborating, superheroes and why Australia doesn't make a good setting for genre fiction.

This one's already in the can, so look for it here on Sunday and on Tor.com the following Tuesday!
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Episode 221: Joe Abercrombie and Sean Williams at the Perth Writers Festival

Is there a difference to writing for younger readers? Do they want or need different kinds of stories? Do they have different expectations from older readers? How do you structure a series? What makes for a rewarding reading experience and how do genre expectations relate to that? 

With new young adult novels published recently, Joe Abercrombie (whose Half the World, second volume in the Shattered Sea series, is just out) and Sean Williams (whose second Twinmaker novel, Crash, came out late last year) sit down with Jonathan to discuss this and more during a fascinating conversation recorded during the Perth Writer's Festival.
As always, our thanks to Joe and Sean, and we hope you enjoy the podcast. More next week!
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New episode coming!

After a short hiatus due to scheduling issues, the Coode Street Podcast returns this weekend with a fascinating discussion with Joe Abercrombie and Sean Williams about writing, young adult fiction, and their new novels Crash and Half the World.

This episode was recorded during the Perth Writer's Festival. Gary was safely asleep in Chicago, so Jonathan did a rare solo episode. Next week will be a return to normal programming as Gary and Jonathan are joined by Deborah Biancotti, Margo Lanagan, and Scott Westerfeld. 
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Episode 220: William Gibson, Eileen Gunn, and Chris Brown

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Welcome to The Coode Street Podcast, an informal weekly discussion about science fiction and fantasy featuring award-winning critics and editors Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe.  The Coode Street Podcast debuted in 2010 and has been nominated for the Hugo, British Science Fiction, and Aurealis awards.

This week Jonathan and Gary talk to old friend  Eileen Gunn, along with  Chris Brown,  and very special guest  William Gibson , in a discussion that ranges from William’s recent novel The Peripheral to the influences of writers as diverse as Mervyn Peake, Philip K. Dick, Alfred Bester, and Avram Davidson and the question of what it means to write in and out of genre. We hope you find it as interesting as we all did recording it. 

Coode Street, Episode 220 (1hr 17mins)

The Coode Street Podcast is published by The Coode Street Press and Gary K. Wolfe, and is syndicated by Tor.com.
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Our Most Popular Episodes as of Today

Top 10 Code Street Episodes

  1. Episode 207 Kameron Hurley 3959
  2. Episode 189 Joe Abercrombie 3900
  3. Episode 209 2987
  4. Episode 162 Rachel Swirsky 2910
  5. Episode 147 M John Harrison 2801
  6. Episode 180 Kelly Eskridge & Nicola Griffith 2756
  7. Episode 191 Jeff VanderMeer 2643
  8. Episode 192 Ann Leckie 2615
  9. Episode 190 James Bradley 2597
  10. Episode 205 Ken Liu on Chinese SF 2347

Because of how the podcast is distributed, these are not total stats. We also only have statistics going back 24mths, so older episodes aren't fully accounted.

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Episode 219: On Short Story Collections and such

Jonathan returns and our heroes spend some time discussing the history and nature of short story collections in science fiction and fantasy. Warning: Contains some facts and a lot of wild speculation.

Next week: William Gibson!
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Episode 218: Harlan Ellison, Bill Schafer and the Volcano

This week, in honor of the new Subterranean Press volume The Top of the Volcano: The Award-Winning Stories of Harlan Ellison, we are joined by Harlan himself, along with Subterranean publisher William Schafer.

Although Jonathan wasn’t able to join us on this one, we get into some fascinating stories about Thomas Pynchon, Octavia Butler, Harlan’s famous house (including the “grotto”), the role of small-press publishers in the history of the field, and what it all looks like from the perspective of a legendary writer in his 81st year.

Note: There's a break at the 42min mark when Gary's cat stepped on his laptop and paused the recording. A few minutes were missed, but conversation continued!!

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